Adventures in Public Health Nursing

Notes on Nursing and other news from the "front lines" of public health. Opinions expressed here are my own and are not intended to represent any organization or employer.

pubhealth:

NOVA
Vaccines Calling The Shots



Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago—whooping cough, measles, mumps—are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. NOVA’s “Vaccines—Calling the Shots” takes viewers around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations, hear from parents wrestling with vaccine-related questions, and shed light on the risks of opting out.
Aired on Wed. Sep. 10th. You can watch it here
(From NOVA-PBS)

pubhealth:

NOVA

Vaccines Calling The Shots

Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago—whooping cough, measles, mumps—are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. NOVA’s “Vaccines—Calling the Shots” takes viewers around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations, hear from parents wrestling with vaccine-related questions, and shed light on the risks of opting out.

Aired on Wed. Sep. 10th. You can watch it here

(From NOVA-PBS)

0 69 notes Reblogged from Public Health
kqedscience:

Parasites Practicing Mind Control
"One reason for Toxoplasma’s success is its ability to manipulate its hosts. The parasite can influence their behavior, so much so that hosts can put themselves at risk of death."

kqedscience:

Parasites Practicing Mind Control

"One reason for Toxoplasma’s success is its ability to manipulate its hosts. The parasite can influence their behavior, so much so that hosts can put themselves at risk of death."

0 83 notes Reblogged from KQEDScience
ilovecharts:

Giving And Getting 
0 3,712 notes Reblogged from I Love Charts
August is National Immunization Awareness Month!
Before you go back to school or work, make sure you & your loved ones are up to date on vaccinations. 

August is National Immunization Awareness Month!

Before you go back to school or work, make sure you & your loved ones are up to date on vaccinations. 

Nurse #RealTalk! #STIs #CheckYoSelf

Nurse #RealTalk! #STIs #CheckYoSelf

Today is National HIV Testing Day.

Did you know that the CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once, and that people who are sexually active get tested at least once a year?

Click through the link to find a testing location near you!

People are suffering and dying because it has become fashionable in the anti-science circles to deny the truth. The truth is that vaccinations save lives and reduce human misery. The truth is that the diseases our great-grandparents knew are still out there, and we should not be playing chicken with them. Don’t be afraid. Get vaccinated. We already know how to protect ourselves. We can stop the next outbreaks of scarlet fever, rubella, diphtheria and so many other miserable and deadly diseases before they even start. We just need to stop listening to people who don’t “believe” in science. Because the thing about science is that it’s real and true whether people want to believe it or not.
Infographic: (via nevver)
On this day in 1881, Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross. 

On this day in 1881, Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross

pubhealth:

Mers virus: US confirms second ‘imported’ case
Health officials have confirmed a second US case of Mers, a virus which has killed more than 100 people.
The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said the second case had been “imported”, meaning a traveller to the US contracted the virus elsewhere.
Middle East respiratory syndrome (Mers) is highly lethal and causes symptoms including fever and kidney failure.
The patient in the first confirmed case has been released from hospital, which says he is “fully recovered”.
The latest case occurred in Florida, US health officials said. A press conference is scheduled for Monday afternoon.
CDC officials said the man in the first US case was a citizen who was travelling to Indiana from Saudi Arabia, where he is a healthcare worker.
He flew to Chicago from Saudi Arabia via London, and took a bus from Chicago to Indiana, where he was admitted to hospital.
Saudi Arabia says more than 130 people infected with Mers have died since an outbreak began in 2012.
On Sunday, the country urged its citizens to wear masks and gloves when dealing with camels so as to avoid spreading Mers.
Mers belongs to the coronavirus family that includes the common cold and Sars, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, which caused some 800 deaths globally in 2003.
Health officials say it is not highly contagious, only appearing to spread through close contact, but there is no known cure.
(From BBC News)

pubhealth:

Mers virus: US confirms second ‘imported’ case

Health officials have confirmed a second US case of Mers, a virus which has killed more than 100 people.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said the second case had been “imported”, meaning a traveller to the US contracted the virus elsewhere.

Middle East respiratory syndrome (Mers) is highly lethal and causes symptoms including fever and kidney failure.

The patient in the first confirmed case has been released from hospital, which says he is “fully recovered”.

The latest case occurred in Florida, US health officials said. A press conference is scheduled for Monday afternoon.

CDC officials said the man in the first US case was a citizen who was travelling to Indiana from Saudi Arabia, where he is a healthcare worker.

He flew to Chicago from Saudi Arabia via London, and took a bus from Chicago to Indiana, where he was admitted to hospital.

Saudi Arabia says more than 130 people infected with Mers have died since an outbreak began in 2012.

On Sunday, the country urged its citizens to wear masks and gloves when dealing with camels so as to avoid spreading Mers.

Mers belongs to the coronavirus family that includes the common cold and Sars, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, which caused some 800 deaths globally in 2003.

Health officials say it is not highly contagious, only appearing to spread through close contact, but there is no known cure.

(From BBC News)

0 33 notes Reblogged from Public Health
Flu Near You - Do you have it in you?